The Soiree, 1963

Medium: Dimensions: 15 X 11-1/4 inches Framed: Price:

Mourlot, edition of 500.

Marc Chagall


The first of nine children born to a poor family, Marc Chagall was born in 1887 in Vitebsk, Byelorussia. Despite his father's disapproval, Chagall pursued his interest in art, going to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study art with Leon Bakst. Influenced by contemporary Russian painting, Chagall's distinctive, child-like style began to emerge. From 1910 to 1914, Marc Chagall lived in Paris, and studied the works of the leading cubist, surrealist, and fauvist painters. He applied bright colors to his artworks, portraying the world with a dreamlike and joyous quality. Chagall's work of this period displays the influence of contemporary French painting, but his style remained independent of any one school of art. He exhibited regularly in the Salon des Independants.

In 1914, before the start of World War I, Marc Chagall held a one-man show in Berlin. During the war, he lived in Russia, where he was appointed Commissar for Fine Arts in Vitebsk and Director of the newly established Free Academy of Art. In 1922, Marc Chagall left Russia and settled in France. He lived there permanently except for the years 1941 - 1948 when, he resided in the United States during World War II.

Marc Chagall received many prizes and much recognition for his work. He was invited to show his paintings at the MOMA in New York and Musee National d’Art Moderne in Paris. His most famous building decorations are the ceiling of the Opera House in Paris, murals at the New York Metropolitan Opera, a glass window at the United Nations, and decorations at the Vatican. Chagall was one of very few artists to exhibit work at the Louvre in their lifetime.








Le Peintre et son Double

Place de la Concorde, 1952

Ceiling of Paris Opera, 1965

The Soiree, 1963

The Ballet, 1969

Lovers in the Orchard

The Magic Flute, 1966
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